Social Care

Person-centred, community based social care.

Research Leads:

Professor Julian Forder, University of Kent, Social Care Theme Lead

Rebecca Sharp, Implementation Manager, Social Care - rebecca.sharp4@nhs.net

Social Care Motif
Social Care Showcase

Aims

The demand for social care is rising, with an ageing population and changes in family caring availability.  Our aim is to undertake research on social care and explore how changes in service provision impacts on service users, their families, carers and others.  We will focus on four main research sub-themes:

1.  We are keen to identify, evaluate and implement new and innovative models of person-centred social care. There has been a resurgence in the idea of strength-based and community-based models of care and we are keen to work with our Co-production theme to identify potential new models and appropriate methods for evaluation.  Working with our Primary & Community Care theme we will also look at Integrated Care, recognising that people using social care are likely to be using a range of other services including health.  We are also keen to work with our Digital theme to harness the use of technology.

2.  We will look to work with partners to explore the variation in the drivers and risk factors for care, and also variation in peoples access to care across the region.  Whilst some variation maybe justifiable to reflect local circumstances, other variation may be unwarranted.  We will work with the public to understand what the needs are and enable better targeted care and support.   We will also work with our partners on the development and access to good data-sets to support our understanding.

3.  Thinking of the effectiveness and long-term sustainability of person-centred social care, we will deploy research evidence to inform improvements in supply, funding and organisation of care across the Kent, Surrey and Sussex region to improve person outcomes.

4.    We will work with our Health and Social Care Economics theme, local and national partners to help develop an understanding of cost effectiveness of person-centred social care and social work activity.  We will build this into the evaluation and implementation of our research.

Looking back

During our first year of operation we have worked across our themes on a number of Covid-19 related research programmes, these include:

  • How can community-based care settings be supported in receiving new and returning clients, during the pandemic?  Led by our Public Health theme, the original study was focussed on supporting assimilation of returning older adults into residential and domiciliary care settings.  This project has since developed into a cross-institutional, interdisciplinary collaboration, and expanded to look at relationships between transmission and care and working practices.

  • To develop and implement culturally appropriate living resources on COVID-19 to support BAME communities, recognising that current public health guidance around COVID-19 is mostly in dominant languages and lacks cultural nuance.  This study focussed on older Indian and Nepalese community members and their families across Kent, Surrey & Sussex, together with health and care professionals working with these communities.
       
  • Community-based volunteering in response to COVID-19. In response to pressures on health and care services and the number of vulnerable people required to self-isolate due to COVID-19, there has been an unprecedented response both in terms of requests for volunteers and also those signing up to offer support.  This study looked at the impact of community-based volunteering on recipients, volunteers and the health and care system.  The key findings and recommendations from the study will look to support and develop a more integrated health and social care system that includes a responsive and resilient voluntary and community sector.     

These studies are now moving into implementation and dissemination stage and we will be sharing our findings across our network. 

We have supported a number of Social Care related research bids, covering development of: research capacity in social care; integrated and linked data-sets to support research in social care; and other care evaluation.

We have engaged and collaborated with many of our stakeholders across the region, introducing the ARC and starting to map current services and demographic data.  This will help to inform our future research programmes and priorities.

Future focus

Our aim is to talk to people locally and hear the voice of our public, service users and carers to understand what is needed to improve adult social care, this includes marginalised groups and those who are self-funding.  It is also to hear from practitioners, providers of services and those who commission services, and to seek their view on future service provision and challenges. 

We will also look to scope what research is already available or underway, with a view to supporting the implementation of high quality, research evidence into practice.

We will also work with our Capacity Building theme and our partners to build research capacity, and develop a sustainable research workforce with expertise in practice and academic environments.

National priorities programme on adult social care and social work
The National Institute for Health Research has commissioned applied research in a number of national priority areas from seven consortia of ARCs to help solve the most pressing issues facing health and social care today.  NIHR ARC Kent Surrey and Sussex  is leading the national priorities programme on adult social care and social work. 

Current Projects

Community-based Volunteering in response to Covid-19

The study, ‘Community-based volunteering in response to COVID-19: the COV-VOL project’, funded by the NIHR Applied Research Collaboration Kent, Surrey and Sussex (ARC KSS), took place during the first lockdown, to look at how the volunteer workforce had rapidly and safely engaged in the community and to determine what impact they had on the older people they supported.

Read all about it here

Co-REM (Co-producing COVID-19 Resources with Ethnic Minorities)

hindi    napali

Leaflets that offer simple and relevant public health information about Coronavirus for the Hindi and Nepali speaking communities have been co-produced and co-designed by a team of researchers at Brighton and Sussex Medical School (BSMS) with the help of community members from Kent, Surrey and Sussex.

The leaflets, developed as part of a Rapid Response COVID-19 project, funded by NIHR ARC Kent, Surrey and Sussex (ARC KSS) and led by Dr Priya Paudyal, Senior Lecturer in Public Health and Course Lead for MSc in Public Health at BSMS and her team, specifically involved Hindi and Nepalese speaking communities to help them better understand how the information should be presented and the language needed to make the biggest impact.

The research team collected feedback from the people involved in the study, as well as the broader communities – including some individuals from Nepal and India and involved the community members from start to finish.

View the Hindi leaflet here

View the Nepali leaflet here

For more information on this project please click here

Quality of Life at Work for the Adult Social Care workforce

Following on from the ARC KSS Homecare Community of Experience that took place in January, a report has been published that looks at research that was undertaken at a time of unprecedented pressure on the social care workforce in England: the COVID19 pandemic.

Like the NHS, social care has been on the front line of the pandemic. However, unlike the NHS, social care is not a unified workforce with a professional identity. Social care is delivered by around 18,200 independent providers and many of its workforce are low-paid and under-valued. Turn-over within the sector is high and recruitment challenging, even for those with professional registration, such as social workers. Understanding and supporting people’s quality of life at work is paramount if we want to retain skilled staff and ensure the best outcomes for those they care for. 

The research team asked what matters most for care workers’ quality of life at work, how it was supported by employers and what staff would find helpful in the future. These findings are summarised in this report, along with recommendations for actions.

Social Care is one of the core themes for the Applied Research Collaboration Kent Surrey & Sussex (ARC KSS), and we are supporting a number of research projects to support both Social Care and Social Work, as well as the implementation of research findings to support evidence-based practice for the sector.  As part our support, we have a number of Communities of Experience developing, for example Homecare or Domiciliary Care, Informal or Family Carers and also the Voluntary, Community and Social Enterprise (VCSE) sector.  If you are interested in hearing more about any of these, or more generally the work of the ARC in the social care sector then please get in touch with Rebecca Sharp, ARC KSS Implementation Manager

To view the report click here.

Recite Me Accessibility Tools